4220 West I-40 Service Road, Oklahoma City, OK, US, 73108

  • Phone: (405) 943-2700
  • Fax: (405) 606-4041
4.2 out of 5 (126 reviews)
83% of guests recommend this hotel
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  • Attractions

    »White Water Bay Water Park

    Hot, humid and sticky summer afternoons in Oklahoma are brutal and consistent. To cool off, bring the family to White Water Bay, the city's largest and most popular water park. The park is fun for all ages, where little tykes can splash around in the shallow 'Kids Kove' and the bigger kids (adults included) take the scarier rides like the 'Acapulco Cliff Dive', 'Pirates Plunge' and 'Cannonball Falls'. For those who aren't in search of thrills, a tranquil inner tube ride down the 'Lazy River' or a comfy beach chair to catch some rays are also perfect options to while away the time. The park is open seasonally; check the website for opening details and calendar.

    3908 West Reno
    Oklahoma City, OK 73107

    »Oklahoma National Stockyards

    This district of town, known as Stockyards City, is home to the largest cattle market in the world. In fact, it was these stock yards that provided the impetus for the state's first major industry. Over the last century, the area had fallen into decline and decay since its inception in 1910, however today the area has been revitalized without losing its authentic 'Old-West' feel. A highlight of the stockyard is a stroll over a walkway that hovers above some of the massive beasts. The shops primarily focus on a variety of western wear, from cowboy hats and boots to Bolo ties and even spurs! It's also pretty accurate to assume that the restaurants in the district serve some of the best steaks in the Midwest, don't forget Cattlemen's Steakhouse. While this area could be considered "touristy," it remains an essential place to visit to get a true picture of 'Ol' OKC'.

    2501 Exchange Avenue
    Oklahoma City, OK 73108

    »Stockyards City

    Stockyards City is a historical part of town that showcases all things Western. When settlers arrived, they used the area as a cattleyard and over the decades it became dotted with packing plants throughout. Today, the cattle market still functions as one of the largest in the world. The packing warehouses are gone, most are replaced with western wear shops and great restaurants, try the popular Cattlemen's Steakhouse, the steaks are outstanding. One of the highlights for guests is the ability to saunter out over a walkway to see the bovines mooing below in the National Stockyards Exchange. If you would like to see a place that played an integral role in the city's history, come down and check out this interesting neighborhood, you might even find that perfect cowboy hat!

    Stockyards City Main Street
    Oklahoma City, OK 73108

    »Will Rogers Park & Garden Center

    The Will Rogers Park & Garden Center contains the Ed Lycan Conservatory, the Charles E. Sparks Rose Garden, the Margaret Annis Boys Arboretum and the Will Rogers Exhibition Center. The entire park is truly a sight to behold with its lush green fields that cover over 130 acres and tons of botanical wonders spread throughout its trails. Visitors and residents are always here on balmy summer evenings to watch the sunset or to take a leisurely stroll. For more sporty activities, the park also contains a Frisbee-golf course and it is the location for the Oklahoma City Tennis Center.

    3400 Northwest 36th Street
    Oklahoma City, OK 73122

    »Wheeler Park

    Wheeler Park, situated along the Oklahoma River, was the original site of the city zoo. Named after the land donor James B. Wheeler, it is a popular recreational spot among locals and visitors. This 43-acre (17-hectare) green space encompasses baseball and athletics fields, the Eggeling Stadium, playgrounds and bike trails. Unwind with a picnic on one of their cozy spots or work a sweat with a game of softball.

    1120 South Western Avenue
    Oklahoma City, OK 73109

    »Gaylord-Pickens Oklahoma Heritage Museum

    This museum is housed in the ornate Mid-Continent Life Insurance building and its primary goal is to inform visitors about the many contributions that Oklahomans have provided to their state and country. Some of the highlights are the 'Bust Gallery', which displays the sculptured likenesses of famous Oklahomans like Maria Tallchief, Ralph Ellison and Mickey Mantle. There is also an interactive exhibit about the Chickasaw Nation and the Chesapeake Oklahoma Theater is located inside. Additionally, the museum provides a backdrop for other events such as field trips, workshops, weddings, etc. Check website for more details and information.   

    1400 Classen Drive
    Oklahoma City, OK 73106

    »Arcadia Lake

    Located on several hundred acres of wooded hills, this large man-made lake offers a variety of water activities including boating and fishing. Sandy beaches along the lake have shower facilities, boat ramps, camping sites, picnic areas, grills, and pavilions.

    218 Turner Turnpike
    Edmond, Oklahoma 73102

    »Oklahoma City National Memorial & Museum

    April 19, 1995 was one of the darkest days in Oklahoma City's history. On that day Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building was attacked by Timothy McVeigh, subsequently killing 168 people. The site contains two parts, the Outdoor Symbolic Memorial and the museum itself. Inside the museum, you will see 168 empty chairs; one for each innocent victim, 19 of which included children. The most endearing tribute, however, is the part of the fence that has been left over from the makeshift memorial that stood here for five years after the attack. Today, visitors will see letters, photos, flowers and other precious sentiments left by survivors and visitors. Also prominently featured in the memorial is the Survivor Tree, it has become a symbol of hope to the people of Oklahoma City. Admission to the outside memorial is free, but the museum charges a fee.

    620 North Harvey Avenue
    Oklahoma City, OK 73102

    »Memorial Institute for the Prevention of Terrorism

    1n 1995, Timothy McVeigh bombed the Alfred Murrah federal building and in response to that tragic attack, the victims' families subsequently created this institute as a center for citizens to become informed about terrorist threats.  Some of the sobering highlights include displays on everything from how victims deal with the outcomes of these attacks to the reasons and conflicts themselves. Another main feature at the institute is the Lawson Library. Here, visitors will find that this repository has the largest collection of homeland security information in the U.S. In order to bring attention to public safety, the institute works with over 800,000 police officers in social policy like continuing education and community relations. Through its online portal, U.S. residents themselves can become involved in law enforcement education to better protect their own communities. 

    621 North Robinson Avenue
    Oklahoma City, OK 73102

    »Overholser Mansion

    This home was built for one of the Oklahoma City's most beloved benefactors, William Overholser. Now nearly a century old, this residence reminiscent of a French chateau gives visitors a glimpse into Oklahoma's early development. Overholser was a successful businessman and the first president of the city chamber of commerce. The interior of the home retains its original antique furnishings and some of the other highlights include imported rugs and decorative stained glass windows. Tours are given every hour starting at 10, and it is always closed during inclement weather.

    405 Northwest 15th Street
    Oklahoma City, OK 73103

    »St Pauls Episcopal Cathedral

    For more than a century, this downtown cathedral has served the Catholic community in Oklahoma City. St. Paul's suffered significant damage as a result of the Murrah bombing, but has since rebuilt, dedicating one of the new structures to those who died on April 19. Guests are invited to attend one of three Sunday services at the cathedral, or visitors can come to its quiet sanctuary to pray and pay their respects to bombing victims.

    127 Northwest 7th Street
    Oklahoma City, OK 73102

    »Paseo Arts District

    What started out as one of the first shopping districts in 1929 gradually evolved to become a haven for jazz musicians, students and small businesses by the end of the 1950s. The end of this era brought with it the counter-culture which determined the atmosphere of the Paseo in the 60's, but it was only until the next decade that it became one of the country's finest art districts. It fell into some decay through the 80's, however today it has been revitalized and the shops host food, art and music festivals year-round. Don't forget the district's 'First Friday Art Walk', where everyone comes out to buy and sell local wares.

    3022 Paseo Street
    Oklahoma City, OK 73103
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